Saturday, September 28, 2013

Training for the Pit

TRAINING FOR THE PIT by Sporting Bull Terrier

There are several systems for training the pit dog for self-defense or prospective battles. We consider the one employed by Mr. L. Bowser and which was published in his "Modern Methods," to be equal if not superior, to any of the others, and with a few eliminations we give it herewith:

This work is for four weeks or twenty-eight days, which is long enough to condition any dog for any battle. In fact, no dog can stand longer training and do well. Experience has proven that with a longer training a dog will become discouraged and train off. If these directions are followed strictly, a dog can, as far as his condition is concerned, fight for four hours at top speed.

I will give each day's work separately. Minor changes may be made by the trainer to suit local conditions, such as bad weather, etc. I give this order for the benefit of professionals as well as for amateurs, for I have had for opponents the best conditioners the country affords, and have yet to meet the man who has shown a dog in as good condition as mine. I train a dog's bite as well as his wind and strength. If he can't beat his opponent to a hold, and bite it when he gets it, he is not worth a bet. Any dog that I train is quick to a hold and has the jaw-power to punish.

First Day

It is to be supposed that your dog is over weight, and is fat and soft. His feet are soft and his toe-nails long. The first thing to do is to clip the toe-nails off, but not so close as to cause bleeding. This will prevent him from tearing them off in his work. Then give him a good bath in lukewarm water, and rub him dry. Use one ounce of creolin to every three gallons of water for his bath. His quarters should be warm and well ventilated, but absolutely free from draughts. His bed should be of good, clean straw, and this should be frequently changed.

Now weigh your dog and you are ready for your first morning's road work. Take your dog out on the chain and lead him about four miles. Never lead a dog behind a horse or buggy, as this fills him up with dust and prevents him from emptying out or urinating when he desires. On returning, give him a good hand rub, always rubbing with the play of the muscles. Then put your dog in his quarters until three o'clock in the afternoon. At that time take him out for a short walk, long enough for him to empty out. Then hitch him to the training machine (described elsewhere) for a run of three minutes. Then take him for a slow walk until he gets thoroughly cooled off. Then take him to your training quarters and rub him well with a Turkish towel, following this with a good hand rub as in the morning. Then wash his feet, first with clean water, and then with a wash made of white oak bark steeped in water. This will toughen his feet. Then allow your dog all the boiled water he will drink. Twenty minutes later feed him his daily meal. This should consist of about one pound of thoroughly boiled lean beef chopped fine and made into a mush with corn meal. This should be sufficient for a day's feed for a forty-five pound dog. I usually take three pounds of first-class lean beef and boil until soft, leaving about two quarts of the broth on it. I then sprinkle in enough corn meal to make a thick mush, stirring the mixture until the corn meal is well cooked. Cool this and you have sufficient for three days' feed. A dog should not be fed more than once a day. Digestion takes place much more slowly in a dog than in most other animals, the food remaining in the stomach for twelve hours and requiring ten hours longer for intestinal digestion

Second Day 

At about 7.00 a.m., take your dog out on the road for at least a four-mile walk, allowing him to empty out and urinate as much as he desires. When you get back, let him work on the coonskin and spring-pole (described elsewhere) for five minutes. Be sure you time the work with a watch. No guess work. You must know exactly how long he works, so that you can see how he improves on a certain amount of work. Then you are to gradually increase his work as he becomes stronger in wind and limb. When you are done working him on the coonskin, cool him off by walking him slowly. Then take him to his quarters, give him his hand rub, and wash his feet in the white oak bark solution. Then give him all the boiled water he will drink, and put him in his quarters until 3:00 p. m. Right here, I wish to say that you should always give your dog, when thoroughly cooled off, all the boiled water he wants to drink all the way through his training. It does not fatten as does unboiled water, and will assist you in preventing your dog from becoming feverish. I have seen dogs nearly crazy from a desire for water after fighting for only twenty or thirty minutes. In fact, I have seen good game dogs that when fighting in that condition would rather scratch at a bucket of water than at their opponents. At 3:00 p.m., after his usual walk to empty out and urinate, hitch your dog to the training machine and run him, say three to five minutes. Then take him for a walk to cool off, and go to the scales. Give him the usual hand rub, and wash his feet in the white oak bark solution. Then put him in his quarters, first allowing him plenty of boiled water to drink, and feed him twenty minutes afterwards.


Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Days

Same as second day, in every particular except to increase the dog's work on the coonskin and spring-pole in the morning and on the training machine in the afternoon, say about two minutes each day. Care should be taken not to increase the dog's work too fast, however. If he can't stand two minutes' increase a day, don't give him quite that much. Be sure not to overdo matters. Remember that we are only getting him ready for his hard work.

Seventh Day

Same as on the preceding day, except that when you bring your dog back from his morning walk, add my fishing-pole exercise to those already indicated. Take a strong fishing pole about eight feet long, with a rope about three feet long on the end, to which a coonskin is securely tied. Let the dog try to get a hold on this coonskin, but do all you can to prevent him from doing so. But you must keep the coonskin close to the ground, so that he will not have to leap in the air after it. Teach him to snap at it and to turn quickly for a hold. Give him about two minutes of this exercise, and then let him work on the spring-pole as before.

Eighth Day

Continue as on the preceding day, increasing the dog's work as already indicated. If your dog has done well, he should by this time be able to run the training machine for eight to ten minutes without being very much fatigued. However, the trainer must use his judgment on this point. Take care not to distress your dog by overwork. By this time he should begin to get over his soreness.

Ninth and Tenth Days

Road work, then the fishing-pole or the spring-pole, whichever the dog seems to like best, for ten or twelve minutes. Do a lot of hand rubbing. In the afternoon hitch the dog to the machine, and then put him away, caring for him as before indicated. After you have put your dog in his quarters for his rest, never allow him to be disturbed. It is hard at times to refuse the request of friends to lead him out or permit them to go to his quarters But it is better that he should not be annoyed. You are training a dog for fighting, so don't make a "society man" out of him.

Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth Days

Same as on the tenth day, but with a gradual increase of work, say a couple of minutes more of each exercise per day

Fifteenth Day

Give the dog his morning walk and care for him afterwards as I have already instructed, but do not give him any pole work at all. At 2:00 p.m., hitch him to the training machine and run him ten minutes (by your watch). Then turn him around and run him five minutes (by your watch) in the opposite direction Now don't guess at the time. Use your watch.

When you unhitch your dog from the machine, wash his mouth out with cool boiled water. Then give him ten or fifteen minutes' work on the fishing-pole and spring-pole. Then put him away, caring for him as previously instructed, except that his food should be changed on this day. It is probable that by this time your dog is at, or a trifle below weight. Get a first-class piece of lean "round" or "rump" steak, and broil it till medium well done. Add four slices of well-browned toast. Chop the steak and toast up fine, mixing them well, and feed cold. A forty-pound dog should have from three to three and a half pounds of steak at a feed, and it should be cooked fresh for him every day. This is to be his feed until he enters the pit. If he is above weight, cut his feed down a little; if below weight, increase it. The trainer must exercise his own discretion on this point. However, be sure to keep your dog strong.

Sixteenth Day

No work in the morning except the usual four mile walk and the usual care afterwards. But at 3:00 p.m., hitch the dog to the machine and give him twenty to twenty-five minutes' work, half the time in one direction and the other half in the opposite direction, always under the watch. Should the dog's mouth get full of saliva while he is working, stop long enough to sponge it out with cool boiled water. Then give him ten to fifteen minutes' stiff work with the coonskin and fishing-pole. After this cool him off and give him a sponge bath with alcohol, and then hand rub him till dry. His feet should be washed every day with the white oak bark decoction. Water and feed him as already directed. From now on, your dog must have his alcohol bath every day, to prevent him from catching cold and getting sore.

Seventeenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth Days

Same as on the sixteenth day in every particular, except that the dog's work should be increased several minutes each day. From the twentieth day on be sure to strengthen your dog's bite and his jaw-power by exercise with the fishing-pole and the spring-pole.

Twenty-First Day

Morning walk and care afterwards, as before indicated At 3:00 p. m., exercise with the training machine and the spring pole.

The dog should now be able to run the machine for twenty-five minutes and work on the spring-pole and fishing-pole for fifteen or twenty minutes without becoming very much exhausted or losing his speed to any great extent.

Twenty-Second Day

Give the dog his morning walk and care for him afterwards as usual. Then, at 2:00 p.m., work him on the training machine and the poles; but don't jump him any more. If he can, by this time, run the machine twenty-five or thirty minutes and work at the poles twenty minutes, he will be in condition to go four hours in the pit. So, all you have to do now is to keep him where you have got him and get him near weight. Always give him good care after work, following the instructions previously given.

Twenty-Third Day

Give your dog his usual morning walk, followed by good care. Then at three in the afternoon give him thirty to thirty-five minutes' work on the machine and twenty minutes on the poles. He must now take hard work, for if he can't work hard and stand up under it, he will not be able to stand up under the strain of battle in the pit. After his exercise care for him in the usual careful manner, except that it may now be desirable to change the hour of feeding. Feed the same feed and the same amount as previously indicated, but if you expect to fight at night (say, the dogs are to enter the pit at 10:00 p.m.) you should feed your dog one hour later each day than the day before, so that on the night of the battle he will have had his last feed at ten o'clock on the night before, or just twenty-four hours previous to entering the pit. In this way you bring your dog empty into the pit, which is essential to his success in the fight.

Twenty-Fourth Day

In the morning, long walk with the usual care afterwards, and in the afternoon stiff work on the machine and poles.

I talk to my dogs a great deal in all my training work. You will find that it pays to do so. You can encourage the dog very much in this way. And then when your dog is in the pit, you can be of very material assistance to him, for he will at times expect your approval and will look and listen for words of encouragement, and he will respond to your words in a manner that will surprise you. Often, I have noticed a dog that I have trained glancing up to me for approval or help, and he would apparently understand me and do as I advised. This is indeed a very important matter. You can't overlook this part of the training and win

Don't forget to give your dog good hand tubs and his alcohol bath daily

Twenty-Fifth Day

Long walk in the morning and good stiff work on the machine and the poles in the afternoon. Let him work on the poles until he is tired. Take care of him, both in the morning and in the afternoon as previously directed. If your dog doesn't eat good, beef tea will be found beneficial in building him up and keeping him strong

Twenty-Sixth Day

Long walk as usual in the morning, followed with the usual care, but only a medium amount of work in the afternoon on the machine and poles You must now begin to slack up on the dog's work. Give him first-class attention, caring for him exactly as previously instructed.

Twenty-Seventh Day

Begin with the usual long walk in the morning. Then give your dog a little less work in the afternoon than on the previous day, if possible, but if he is hard to keep to weight, you will have to give him more work. At all events, don't cut down his feed in order to lessen his weight. Better give him work and feed than to let him be without food and idle. I have found that an unusually long walk helps a great deal to keep a dog to weight, and this is probably the best way to do it, for there is no danger of over-work in this plan. Care for your dog in other respects as already suggested.

Twenty-Eighth Day, or Day of Battle

Give your dog a long walk in the morning, so that he can empty out thoroughly. Water him and care for him as on other mornings, but omit the hand rub, or at most rub only lightly. Be sure to walk your dog to the pit, if practicable, but if not practicable give him a walk long enough to allow him to empty out before weighing. When he has been weighed give him three or four ounces of strong beef tea. I find this much superior to anything else that has ever been used in this place. You should carry a bottle of beef tea to the pit with you, and when you get a scratch pour a swallow or two on your dog's tongue. It will serve both as a drink and as a stimulant. In the pit, try to keep in such a position that your dog can see you. When he is in a tight place, get as close to him as you can. Your presence will even stimulate him.

If he is in need of rest, and is not being hurt, try to keep him quiet until he has recuperated; and then, when he shows he is ready, help him with words and looks of encouragement.

Now, if you have followed these instructions carefully and intelligently, you should have your dog in as good a condition as it is possible for human skill to make him.

If you cannot give the time to train your own dog, by all means know the man you hire, and be sure he is above being bribed.

Monday, September 16, 2013

What To Do When Animal Control Comes Knocking

What Every Animal Owner Needs to Know - When the Pet Police Knock On Your Door!

Don’t be intimidated when local animal control, humane societies, law enforcement or state inspectors knock on your door.

Be prepared! Know your constitutional rights. Post “No Trespassing” signs on your property front, back and at all gates. Just as a family should have a rehearsed plan to escape a house fire, all animal owners should have a plan when confronted by Pet Police. In addition, make sure that your family, babysitter, dog-sitter, housekeeper and others know that they should not let the Pet Police into your home or on your property (i.e. back yard, garage, etc.). Share the following information with them:

* If someone knocks on your door, you are not obligated to answer it unless they identify
themselves and state they have a search warrant.

* Never assume that you have “nothing to hide.” In some circumstances animal control officers, unable to find a legitimate reason to make an arrest, have reported minor building or zoning violations.

*If you have purchased special permits [Breeder, Rescuer, Intact Pets, Animal Owner] stipulating that local or state governments have permission to enter your premises at any time, refusal to allow them entrance may result in revocation of your permit. If you have signed such a permit they still cannot enter against your wishes since you can revoke the permission at any time. You must weigh the consequences.

* If you decide to open the door, have your cell phone in your pocket. Call the police and report trespassing. Before you step outside, call your neighbor, friend, lawyer to come immediately. The more witnesses, photographs, video and tapes recorded the better.

* Keep your hands in plain sight. People have been shot by police when common objects
were mistaken for a gun.

* If your cell phone does not have photographing capabilities, keep a camera (with fresh
batteries) near your door for just such emergencies. Keep a pen and paper readily available at the door.

* After answering the door, step outside and close the door behind you. Anything seen through an open door is "plain sight" and may be misused as the basis for an arrest, or probable cause for a search warrant.

* Do not answer any questions. Ask them to submit questions to you in writing. Be polite but firm.

* Ask the following questions: (1) their full name, title and phone number; (2) agency’s full name and address; (3) supervisor’s full name and telephone number; (4) ask why they are there; (5) if a complaint, ask for name of complainant and a copy of the complaint. (6) Note the names of anyone else present.

* Call their offices to verify because scams have been reported in the news where imposters pretended to be utility workers, gained entry, then robbed the owners. Make them wait outside until verification is completed.

* If they have no search warrant and demand to enter your home or other areas of your property, tell them politely, but firmly, to leave. If they try to intimidate you to let them in the house by telling you they can obtain a search warrant, advise them confidently, that they are not coming in without one.

* If they do not leave, open the door slightly and back up into your house. If you turn around to go back inside, it may be interpreted as an invitation to follow. Once inside, close the door, call 911. Tell the operator you are being harassed by trespassers who refuse to leave. Inform the operator if they have weapons and you fear for your safety.

* If you turn Animal Control or other government officials away, assume they will be back. Use the time available to move as many animals off the property as possible and make sure everything is clean and presentable.

SEARCH WARRANT

* If they have a Search Warrant, read it closely. This permission does not allow more than one person to enter. Keep them in sight at all times. If anyone other than true law enforcement officials are there, ask the officers to remind those other people of criminal trespassing laws. They should leave.

* After reading the Search Warrant closely: Make sure you know the areas they are authorized to search. If they stray to an unauthorized area, remind them they are not allowed there. Demand a receipt for everything removed, including all animals.

* Do not answer any questions other than identifying yourself. They may try to trick you with questions. Do not answer them. You cannot win, except by remaining silent and calm. Cooperation will not usually avoid prosecution.

* If you have an attorney and are able to make a call, let him know there is an execution of a search warrant occurring.

* If your rights are violated, file a complaint with the appropriate body.


TEXAS DOG AND CAT BREEDER LAW

Without a Search Warrant, state inspectors do not have the right to come on the property of any breeder unless the breeder has obtained or applied for a license. Inspections can only occur under one of two circumstances: 1) pre-license inspection and 2) compliance inspection. Licensed breeders are subject to unannounced inspections anytime. As of September 1, 2012, dog and cat breeders possessing 11 or more adult [over 6 months of age] intact females and engaged in the business of breeding those animals for sale or exchange for consideration and sells or offers to sell not fewer than 20 animals annually are required to be licensed by the state.


THINGS TO REMEMBER

* Do not argue, bad-mouth, curse, touch, threaten or try to intimidate the officer. Avoid anger and violence at all costs. Do not physically resist an officer, no matter how unlawful his or her actions. Do not try to tell your side of the story nor “explain” anything. You will have time for explanations after you talk to the lawyer. If the questioning persists, demand to speak to a lawyer first. Repeat as necessary.

* IF ARRESTED: Exercise your right to remain silent. Answer no questions until you have consulted with a lawyer. Under the Fifth Amendment, you do not have to incriminate yourself.

* Within a reasonable time they must allow you to make a phone call to contact a lawyer and arrange bail. They are not allowed to listen to your phone call to your attorney but they may “monitor” the rooms “for your protection.” Do not say anything you do not want them to overhear; save that for your attorney until after you are out on bail.

* If you are physically injured by any persons, take photographs of the injuries immediately. Do not forego proper medical treatment.

* Write down all of the information, as well as the date and time of the incident immediately, while details are fresh in your mind. Keep notes as they can be valuable evidence to defend yourself at a later time.

DISCLAIMER!

Due to the potentially complex nature of varying city and county ordinances combined with state law and regulation, this information is neither intended to be, nor should it be relied upon as, legal advice or as a substitute for personal consultation with a licensed attorney. This is provided for information purposes only. No liability can be assumed in connection with any use of the information contained herein.

Texas Penal Code Criminal Trespass Statute:
http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/PE/htm/PE.30.htm

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Schooling by California Jack

I believe one of the most important aspects of these dogs (other than buying a good dog) is schooling that good dog properly. I can't even begin to count the number of good dogs that have been ruined by their owners due to being schooled improperly.

The major problem I have noticed is that most dog men have what I call "right now" mentality. They want to test their dogs "right now" and so they put their prospects through prolonged ordeals for little more than their entertainment. Sure, we all find what these dogs do to be entertaining, but it must be kept in mind that it is also very serious business, so it should be treated accordingly. You must look at each schooling roll as a lesson, and as such, each lesson should have a definite reason behind it. Every schooling roll should be planned well in advance, and one should put in whatever time is necessary to shop around for the correct opponent to fulfill the pre-planned objective.

It is your dog's job to be good and game, but it is your job to manage the animal properly. Therefore, you do not just set your dog down at the drop of a hat, or because someone says his dog is better than yours. Each schooling lesson should have a reason, and that reason should always be in the interests of the dog's development.

This is especially true with young dogs. Too many times dog men will take a young dog into its first lesson without any idea of what they're going to be running their young dog into. You should always start your dog against a somewhat smaller opponent that you know has a light mouth. The reason for this is simple: you don't want to discourage your young dog with too much on his first time out and your dog, when he starts, should be rewarded by being able to dominate his opponent. Your dog will be unable to do these things if his first roll is against a bone crusher that is 10 lbs. bigger than he is. Remember, in schooling, you always want to give your dog positive reinforcement, not negative reinforcement.

Yet you will find many so-called "dog men" putting their young dog against the first dog they come across whether it's in their dog's interests or not. Again, they have to see something "right now," so instead of choosing the best opponent to school the dog with, they invariably wind up going into a considerably larger dog than what would have been best for their young prospect. To make things worse, they will then proceed to let the contest continue to the point where their dog not only gets its butt kicked, but they allow the dog to get exhausted too. The excuses are always the same: "Well, I couldn't find a dog my dog's size," or "I was waiting for my dog to come to the top so I could pick it up then," or this is the best one "If my dog was a real dog he could have handled it." It is an owner's job to be a real dog man every bit as much as it is a dog's job to be a real dog. Putting a dog against any old opponent for the hell of it, or letting schooling lessons go the distance every time, is not being a real dog man. It's being a "right now" man.

Some dog men mean well, but they just fall victim to impatience or a lack of confidence to say "No" to a bad deal for their dog. One of the problems often found in this regard is telling a partner, or a rival kennel, that you want to school a young prospect against an opponent at a specific weight but when you get there the opponent's dog looks bigger than what he claimed it to be. ALWAYS INSIST ON WEIGHING BOTH DOGS BEFORE YOU PUT THEM TOGETHER. If your opponent refuses to weigh his dog, the chances are it's because he knows it's bigger than yours. If this ever happens to you, remember you are not required to set the dogs down "right now." Instead, put your dog back into the crate and go home. Next time your partners will take you more seriously when you say you want to school dogs at "x" weight. If this happens too many times, then find yourself more reputable schooling partners.

If your schooling partners give you the "If your dog was a real dog..." trip, tell them if their dog was a real dog they wouldn't have to pick on smaller dogs. If you have respectable partners and your dogs are the same weight but your young dog happens to be getting the worst of things, pick him up before he gets tired. Unless this was a pre-planned game test, you don't have to find out "right now" if your dog has what it takes. Remember, you are schooling your dog at this point, not game-testing him, and you don't want your dog to experience anything negative about what he's doing yet.

In fact, other than the game test (which I discuss in depth under a separate heading), no schooling lesson should be longer than 15 minutes, and most should be between 5 and 10 minutes. After almost 10 years in this game, and schooling dogs in many different ways, I am positive that repeated exhaustion is the worst thing for a dog's mindset. It is much better to school a dog frequently, against opponents of varying styles, for short periods of time. Why? Because dogs form simple associations in their thinking. Most of us have heard of the famous psychologist Pavlov, whose most famous experiment was ringing a bell every time he fed his dog. Soon his dog would drool every time he heard that bell, whether or not he actually had food in front of him. Well, do you really want your dog to form a similar association between performance and extreme fatigue? That is, do you want your dog to associate something unpleasant (always getting horribly tired) with what he's supposed to like (being in the pit)?

Think deeply about gameness, and then think deeply about exhaustion. Gameness is defined as an enthusiastic will to win. By contrast, serious exhaustion is no fun at all, and it can even be life-threatening (especially if associated with injury). When you school a dog, remember that in addition to developing his performance skills you are also trying to develop the dog's enthusiasm and if you bring about exhaustion in your dog's schooling lessons then you are defeating your purpose. There is nothing enjoyable about being dead-ass tired. Think about it. To help illustrate this point, boxers do not spar for 15 rounds every time they get in the ring for practice, either. Rather, they usually go 3 rounds and then do other exercises. No one would want to be a boxer if you were required to go through 12 to 15 rounds of hell, out of shape, every damned time you lace on a pair of gloves and neither will your young dog want to be a performer if it winds up tripping over its tongue, and getting the shit knocked out of it, every time it sees a pit. Use your head. This is also why you don't put your dog into a hard mouth dog either, until he gets a sense of defense and confidence first. Many dog men fundamentally blow it by giving their dogs mild game tests while they're schooling their prospects, by allowing their dogs to get to the 20 - 30 minute range. At the schooling stage of your dog's development, you should not be discouraging your dog with too much of an ordeal.

Once your is thoroughly schooled and fully started THEN you can game test him. A dog needs a minimum of 5 short rolls (against opponents of varying styles) to be considered thoroughly schooled, and I define a dog as fully started when he will go across on his own and take hold. (If he has to wait for the other dog to bite him first, the dog is not fully started and cannot be judged yet.) If your dog has been properly schooled, so he knows what to do against a wide variety of styles, and he is fully started, you then select an opponent that is a proven good dog, and perhaps a pound or two heavier than your dog, for the game test. Make sure that your dog is lean and healthy (but not conditioned) and parasite free before you put him through the rigors of a serious game test. Now is the time where you finally let things go the distance, and you may now pass judgment on your dog's true quality. You get to look at his overall ability throughout the long haul, his natural air, his intelligence and adaptability to each situation, how he acts in the corner and scratches, his desire to finish if things go his way and his deep gameness if they don't. After the smoke clears, you can happily breed the dog, show the dog or get rid of the dog, but don't ever game test the dog again.

The reason I say don't test your dog ever again is I have seen many people game test a dog once, and then they second-guess the test a month or so later. "I'm not sure I tested him hard enough," they think to themselves. What this means is the dog's owner lacks confidence in his own judgment, and in reality he is just scared to match the dog, or to declare him game so he tests the animal again. This kind of human cur basically is afraid to be wrong in his judgement in front of his peers, so he tests his dogs over and over again "just to be sure." You must face the fact that there is no amount of game testing you can do which will guarantee your dog will win a match, or that he won't quit his next time out.

So once you actually game test your dog, if he passes the test then either match him after that, or breed to him, but if you game test your dog again, then what you are doing is revealing yourself to be a cur, and a lousy manager of your dog, because you are putting excess mileage on him for nothing. For let's suppose your dog does pass a second game test, what you just did is you took one good match from his win record and threw it in the trash.

Moreover, you will have put your dog through back-to-back traumas, running the risk of having your dog begin to form an association of performance and severe exhaustion. If you're going to take that risk with your dog, it may as well be for real in a match. If you match your dog and he gets stretched out again in his contest, wait several months for your dog to recover, and then "practice" with him again for 5 minutes against a dog he can easily handle and then do it again a month later. Once again, the reason to do this is you do not want your dog to associate performance with horrid exhaustion, because that more than anything else will ruin a dog. You may love ice cream, but if you were forced to eat 40 buckets of it several times in a row, you just might lose your taste for it after a while. Get my drift?

To those "hard core" dog men out there who think I am being too soft on a dog and that this is babying a dog too much which will result in curs escaping "true testing". I say BULLSHIT. I don't care how game a dog has shown in the past, it can be stopped if you really want to stop it. If you doubt me then try this test: set your dog down for 40 minutes. Then set him down the next day for 40, and do it again and again, 40 minutes every damned day of his life, and believe me, he'll quit. No one would test their dogs this hard, of course, because it's unfair to the animal, and no bloodline or individual dog could pass this severe a testing process. So don't get all high and mighty about how game any dog is, he'll quit if you test him hard enough or often enough. I don't care what he's shown in the past.

The point of this article is many dogs that have quit and been put down would not have quit had they been brought along properly. Your job as his owner is to try not to have him quit by managing the animal properly, and this schooling process I have outlined will help your dog along in this regard. The key to schooling a dog is to remember it is just that: schooling.

You school your dog for only two reasons:

1) to develop his style and

2) to develop his confidence.

Schooling is something totally different from game-testing. Once you finally game test your dog, or if he gets exhausted after any match, remember to "review" with him for a short period against an easy opponent a few months later.

The bottom line is never let your dog form the association of extreme exhaustion and pit action and you will go a long way towards keeping him in there when he finds himself in the trenches.

Anyway, once your is thoroughly schooled and fully started THEN you can game test him or match him. If he looks good, I suggest you simply match him. But suppose he's just OK. Bred great, acts great, but not talented enough to be matched. It is here, in my opinion, where the game test comes in (or for a retired match dog that was never stretched out in any match due to his ability). You have to know his true quality before you breed him. Whatever the case, the dog should be both thoroughly schooled and fully started before being game-tested. A dog needs a minimum of 5 short rolls (against opponents of varying styles) to be considered thoroughly schooled, and I define a dog as fully started when he will go across on his own and take hold. (If he has to wait for the other dog to bite him first, the dog is not fully started and cannot be judged yet.)

If your dog has been properly schooled, so he knows what to do against a wide variety of styles, and he is fully started, you then select an opponent that is a proven good dog, and perhaps a pound or two heavier than your dog, for the game test. Make sure that your dog is lean and healthy (but not conditioned so you can also check his natural air) and parasite free before you put him through the rigors of a serious game test. Now is the time where you finally let things go the distance, and you may now pass judgment on your dog's true quality. You get to look at his overall ability throughout the long haul, his natural air, his intelligence and adaptability to each situation, how he acts in the corner and scratches, his desire to finish if things go his way and his deep gameness if they don't. After the smoke clears, you can happily breed the dog, show the dog or get rid of the dog but don't ever game test the dog again.

The reason I say don't test your dog ever again is because I have seen many people game test a dog once, and then they second-guess the test a month or so later. "I'm not sure I tested him hard enough," they think to themselves. What this means is the dog's owner lacks confidence in his own judgment, and in reality he is just scared to match the dog, or to declare him game - so he tests the animal again. Such people basically are afraid to be wrong in their judgement in front of their peers, so they tests their dogs over and over again "just to be sure." Understand that there is no amount of game-testing which will assure you that your dog won't quit the next time up. Nor will there be any game test that will assure you of a victory when you match the dog. That's why we call it gambling. Even such great dogs as GR CH Sandman and GR CH Texas both quit and lost when they faced the right dogs. Does this mean that Texas and Sandman really were not very good dogs? No, they were great dogs, they were just taken to the well one too many times.

If being a multi-winner in the hands of excellent dog men cannot guarantee your dog of victory, then being "multi-game-tested" won't either. What it will guarantee you is that you have taken additional matches out of your dog, since a real game test is tougher on a dog than most matches. So, as I said, school your dog first - then (if you like what you've seen so far) it is time for a game test - or go for a cheap match instead as I prefer. Whatever you do, just don't continually game test your dog out of your own lack of gameness in not being able to decide whether or not you like what you've seen. This is the bottom line I have noticed in nearly all dog men who game test their dogs several times - they're too chickenshit just to bring the dog out and take a risk on losing. And in testing their dog repeatedly, what they don't realize is that each time they beat their dog up in a game test, they decrease its chances of winning a match by putting unnecessary trauma on the animal and throw a potential win in the trash. Every game test, or match, for a pit dog is about like 30 to 40 matches for a boxer, which is why a 3x winning pit dog is considered to be a Champion, and a 5x winner a Grand Champion. To be able to win just one tough match is an accomplishment for a dog, to win 3 or 5 times is something special. So don't take unnecessary wins out of your dog by repeatedly game-testing it. Understand what a game test is for. It's just to get an idea. An idea of what your dog is made of - not a guarantee. There are no guarantees in this sport.

What you are trying to do in a game test is you basically are trying to bring a dog to a point where there is some threat to the animal's life, and you are trying to see how he handles it by his attitude. Does he want to keep going? Is he thinking about quitting? You have to put a certain amount of trauma on the dog, in the form of dominance, fatigue, and punishment, in order to figure this out. However, you must exercise good judgment and not let your dog actually lose his life. A dead dog cannot be matched, it cannot be bred, and most people would be uninterested in purchasing a dead dog so only a fool would take a dog to the point of no return in a game test, for this will accomplish nothing, except to prove what a heartless idiot his owner is. Nonetheless, you want to bring about conditions in a game test that come just close enough to make you start to worry that your dog's life might be in danger.

To do this, you need to select the proper opponent for your dog, one which is probably a pound or two heavier, and a proven good dog. If you know what you are doing, you do not have to use two dogs to game test your dog. Using two dogs is far too risky for your dog's safety, as if they are both good dogs going against him, your dog's chances of death or irreparable injury are great. (If they are not good dogs, then why use them?) Using two dogs in a game test only proves that the dog's owner doesn't have a good eye for what he's looking for, nor good judgment as a manager in looking out for his fighter's interests (unless the first dog happens to get wrecked). You are trying to test your dog's gameness, reasonably and safely; you are not trying to break his bones or take his life. If you take too much out of your dog, by putting dog after dog on him, or by putting him too far uphill in weight, you will either kill your dog or get him injured so badly that he will be rendered useless as a match dog.


WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Some of the signs to look for in a game dog are:

Top or bottom, winning or losing, does your dog stay in holds? To me, one of the surest signs of gameness (or lack thereof) is whether (or not) the dog is a holding dog. If your dog is always in there with a hold somewhere, no matter how tough it is for him, the chances are he's a game one because he's still trying to win. But if your dog goes down and he let's go and starts to panic, and he seems more preoccupied with getting up than he is with doing his job, the chances are he's a quitter.

Does your dog have a confident expression on his face; in other words, does he look like he's enjoying what he's doing? No matter what's happening, your dog should always be intense and think he's winning. If your dog's eyes start to wander, or if he turns away from his opponent at some point, and/or starts hollering in pain, the chances are he's thinking about doing something else.

Is your dog's tail up and wagging, or is it dropped, limp, and/or fuzzing up at the back. You should hope that it's arched over his back (and/or wagging) or you are probably the owner of a cur.

Does he struggle in the corner to get back to his opponent, or does he just stand there content that he's been given a break? A good dog is upset that the action was stopped and wants nothing more than to return to it and he'll let you know it by the way he acts in the corner. But if your dog is in the corner and does nothing but stand there looking up at you, the chances are it's OK with him that you stopped things for awhile which is not what you're looking for.

When he's tired and is turned back around to face his opponent, does he hold his head up and look down at his opponent - or does he hold his head down and look up at his opponent? A tired dog that lifts his head up generally is letting fatigue whip him and is concentrating on his breathing and is therefore sure to quit to fatigue; by contrast, the tired dog that lowers his head and glares up at the dog is suppressing fatigue and is maintaining focus on the opponent which is what you want.

Finally, how does your dog scratch? I realize that some very good dogs happen to be slow scratchers, but generally you want a dog that scratches HARD. Some hard scratchers have bashed their heads against the boards (in missing their ducking opponents) enough times where they adjust their style. They'll tippy-toe half way (making sure that their opponent isn't going anywhere), and then they'll rocket across and really blast their opponent. Whatever the case, not only is hard scratching a very good indicator of a dog's gameness, but it can actually stop the opponent's dog when things get in the trenches. How would you like to be in a knock-down, drag-out fight with someone for an hour and still have your opponent screaming and struggling to get back at you, like nothing's ever happened? Well, if your dog's opponent has any cur in him, your dog's hard scratches tell him, "NOTHING YOU DO HAS ANY EFFECT ON ME!" Hard scratches have stopped many an opponent.

The bottom line is, only after you have schooled your dog properly should you game test your dog - and do that only once. If your dog passes your game test, then either show the dog, or breed to the dog, or get rid of the dog, but don't deliberately put him through the rigors of a game test again. Doing this will save your dog's best efforts for the show, and it will keep him in there longer if things do go the distance for real. If you insist on game-testing your dog several times, and he follows this with a long hard match, look for the fat lady to sing eventually if you keep this kind of thing up. You must always keep in mind the medical evidence proven by Pavlov: dogs form simple associations in their thinking.

If you stretch your dog out too hard, and/or too many times in a row (without breaking up the pattern with short, easy ones), the chances are very, very high that you are taking steps toward ruining your dog because he will begin to associate the pleasantness of fighting contact with the unpleasantness of horrid exhaustion/punishment. You may love ice cream, but if you are forced to eat 40 buckets of it every time you sit down to eat it, and if you do this often enough, you just might lose your taste for it after a while. Get my drift? Therefore, don't ruin your dog's love of battle by repeatedly stretching him out and beating him up, and you will go a long way toward keeping him in there if things do happen to go the distance for real in a match.


TIP

If you game test your dog prior to matching him, or if you've matched your dog and he gets stretched out hard in his contest, and you want to avoid your dog forming this negative association of pit action and exhaustion/punishment, here's the antidote: Wait several months for your dog to recover, and then give him a light bump for 5 minutes against a dog he can easily handle and then do it again a month later. Once again, the reason to do this is you do not want your dog to associate performance with horrid exhaustion, because that more than anything else will ruin a dog. Breaking up a grueling ordeal with a couple of easy ones is they way to avoid your dog forming this association.

To those "hard core" dog men out there who think I am being too soft on a dog and that this is babying a dog too much, which will result in curs escaping "true testing". I say BULLSHIT. My dogs have an 86% gameness ratio against some of the best dogs/kennels in the country, some of whom have proven to be as game as any dogs that have ever lived, literally dying in holds or crawling for more. So these methods work. Still, I don't care how game a dog has shown in the past, it can be stopped if you really want to stop it.

If you doubt me then try this test: set your dog down for 40 minutes. Then set him down the next day for 40, and do it again and again, 40 minutes every damned day of his life, and believe me, he'll quit. No one would test their dogs this hard, of course, because it's unfair to the animal, and no bloodline or individual dog could pass this severe a testing process, so I think I've made my point. Therefore, don't get all high and mighty about how game any dog is, he'll quit if you test him hard enough, or often enough. I don't care what he's shown in the past. The point of this article is many dogs that have quit and been put down would not have quit had they been brought along properly.

Your job as his owner is to try not to have him quit by managing the animal properly, and this schooling and game-testing process I have outlined will help your dog along in this regard. The key to schooling a dog is to remember it is just that: schooling. You school your dog for only two reasons: 1) to develop his style and 2) to develop his confidence. Schooling is something totally different from game-testing. Once you finally game test your dog, or if he gets exhausted after any match, remember to bump him for a short period against an easy opponent a few months later and then do it again a month after that. This will prevent your dog from forming the association of extreme exhaustion and pit action - and will go a long way towards keeping him in there when he finds himself in the trenches when the money is on the line.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Finkle Winkle's Keep

During the years involved in this great breed, I worked many times a day to his true weight and best shape possible, and I made many mistakes as well, but I guess, with the mistakes in mind, the keeping which I'll share with you, is a proven one, in the best sense of the world, since the simple keep delivered me, many a winner, who's not seldom, winning over the other entry due to their better shape.

First, you must worm your dog, 2 weeks before the pre-keep start. Clip his toenails and give him a warm bath and wash him good with Jodium-Scrub. Go to the vet and get the dog a check up, check the liver, kidneys, blood and stool, check it out good. If the dog is healthy, the green light is on, it's time to condition your dog now.

Change his daily feed to dry dog food, specially made for the needs of canine sporting animals. I, myself use Eukanuba Premium, it works good for my dogs. Give the dog, except shortly after his daily workout, all the fresh water he'll drink, day and night.

Week 1

* 1 hour hand walking, on a long leash, on a good harness. Walk on different types of soil, grass, dirt roads, hills, etc
* 20 minute rub down
* Feed and watering after rub down
* Rest the dog
* Give him one day of no work at all, don't rub him down as well. On such rest day, you'll add less food to his feed pan


Week 2

* 1.5 hours of hand walking
* 20 minutes rub down
* Feed and watering after rub down
* Rest the dog
* Give him one day of no work at all, don't rub him down as well. On such rest day, you'll add less food to his feed pan


Now the dog is used on some work, watch him closely during the whole progress. If he's looking sore, tired, etc., don't hesitate to rest him an extra day.

We're going to start now with 2 weeks of building up the dog to make him ready to stand the pressure and stress, while worked the fifth and heaviest week of training.

Week 3

Monday:

1 hour of hand walking
5 minutes of treadmill
15 minutes of hand walking

Tuesday:

2 hours of hand walking

Wednesday:

10 minutes of mill work

Thursday:

2 hours of hand walking

Friday:

15 minutes mill work

Saturday:

Rest day

Sunday:

We'll start again

Add in the 3rd week, 25 grams if boiled rive and 25 grams of boiled meat to his daily dry feed and add 2 multi-vitamin tabs.


Week 4

Same as last week, only you add more time/work like this: treadmill - 20 to 25 to 30 minutes, 2.5 hours of hand walking. Week 4, add 50 grams of rice and meat to his feed pan and the two tabs.


Week 5

The 5th week is the heaviest week, 3 hours of hand walking, except at his mill work days, treadmill for 35 to 40 to 45 minutes.

Saturday - Rest until Sunday. Feed stays the same, if he's loosing too much weight, add some extra dry feed.


Week 6

The sixth and last week, 10 minutes of mill work, 1.5 hours of hand walking, 5 minutes mill, 1 hour hand walking, 30 minutes hand walking. Then, rest prior to the match. At match day, walk him/her out every 3 hours, just to urinate and to relieve him/herself good.

At the 14th day of training, the dog must be a half a kilogram above his true show weight. Keep him like that during the entire keep. The first two rest days, at the end of the 6th weeks, don't give him rice or meat.

Last meal should be 24 hours before the event. Take his water away 12 hours before and give him a half a liter of boiled chicken bouillon as his last drink 12 hours before. His last mill should consist of 50 grams rice, 50 grams meat and dry feed, no tabs.

I avoid all bite work, jumping, hanging, etc. Also, steroids I skipped out on. A keep like this simple one, I will use 1 cc of dexamethasone/azium 48 hours before and 1 cc 24 hours before and 1 cc 2 hours before.

This keep blessed me with 1 hour and 2 hour winners.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Why Don't You Listen?

Why Don't You Listen

In this article aimed at the beginners, I'd like all to know that I started out with these dogs way back in 1972 and been there and done what most of you beginners are doing or either are about to do with your dogs. I have learned from some of the best in the game. What I'd like to pass on to you beginners are answers to questions that you guys have been searching for. More dogs that I can count have been ruined by beginners that thought they knew what they were doing, but never even had an idea as to what they were really doing, ruining dogs, friendships, and most of all, ruining the game. We never stop learning in this game, as in life, so my question here is "Why Don't You Listen?" This is one reason why most old timers won't have anything to do with you guys. After reading this, I'm sure you beginners will start taking heed to what the old timers are taking the time to tell you. Because if you don't, you'll end up being a beginner with 5 or 10 years at the front gate of this game. Never entering in any enjoying for years. It's not that we don't want you all in the game, or don't like most beginners. What it is, is that we know what your outcomes will be nine out of ten. We tell you to "go this way" or "do this for better results", but nine out of ten, you reply with "that old fool don't know anything" those nine beginners results will be ruined dogs. Let's not forget about the one beginner who does everything that the old timers advise, this guy will even see an old timer do something, and you can bet that he too is doing the same thing with his own dogs. His results will be winning dogs. He's the guy who jumped in the game with both feet. He's the guy who loves being around the old timers, listening to their stories, learning something on every visit or outing. You other nine beginners need to be like this one beginner who will grow up to be a seasoned dog man. The bottom line is that if you're going to be in this game, then grow up and learn all that you can from the old timers. They're the ones that know these dogs and this game, like you beginners would like to know them.

The old timers don't want you to waste dogs and years going through trial and error. You'd save a lot of time and some game dogs listening to some of the old timers, so come on and grow into the dogman you know you should be. That cocky pride won't get you anything but a high priced loss to another beginner who's an apprentice of an old timer himself. None of the qualities of the old timers life can be learned out of a book.

Something more like apprenticeship is required, being around someone who out of years of devoted discipline shows us by his entire behavior, moments of verbal instructions will certainly occur, but mostly an apprentice acquires his skills by daily association with the old timer. Picking up absolutely essential things such as starting a dog's breeding program. If a dog is worth breeding, the keep, when a dog is ready for a match, and handling, etc. One such legendary pair was Joe Corvino, the master, with Sonny Sykes, the apprentice. Sonny learned what it took to become a seasoned dogman, respected among his pears.

- Dogman of Old School Combine

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Don't Breed That Damn Dog!

Don't breed that damn dog! Look, there is an epidemic among the dog game today as I look about and it is the shear overpopulation and constant breeding "speculations." Could you imagine how our air quality would be if every guy that could tinker with a car were allowed to build his own to any standard? Nor much to imagine, so society has standard of for a vehicle that is to to inspected and run on state roads. Don't you think it is time that we as game dog owners take some responsibility for the problems at hand? So again, let me say, don't breed that damn dog. Here is the main problem; a man gets himself a pup from breeder A and another from breeder B. The pups get into adolescence and the owner breeds them together speculating that this breeding will nick. And when they do, you will go mad trying to repeat the performance from the first litter that brought on the desire for continued success down this alley. We as dog owners need and must stop making speculative breedings except for personal use. It is ridiculous when you see two dogs bred together with a total win record between them and their grandparents of 0-0. How many times have two yearlings that were bought as pups were bred together by "accident" and then the owner sells them as fine representatives of the bloodlines shown in the breeding of the parents, that are mere pups themselves. What can we do as game dog owners? How about if you want to sell some puppies to do the game a favor, and you take your bitch to a proven producer and quit playing craps with the rest of our dogs. Take that bitch to people like DSK or Boyles or Tant or JC Shaw or Garner or STP or TVK or Captain America. Or go to Jim Bob's Bulldog Barn in Yahoo, Idaho who recently purchased the Super Champion "enter name here" and proven producer and offers him at stud fee to your liking. Make an effort to breed your bitches for pups to sell to top flight dog men. All ideas are welcomed and encouraged to lower population of our dogs and get them out of the general public. Please participate in this effort as our dog's future is in our hands.

- Fat Bill

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Fat Bill's Keep

Training or conditioning a Pit Bulldog for show or for combat is an individual effort. Your success will greatly depend upon the amount of time and effort that you are willing to spend on your dog. This keep is based upon the idea that anyone can bring a dog up to say, 50% of his potential for strength and endurance. A top amateur can train a dog up to 75%, while a top professional can consistently show dogs at around 90% or more of their potential. This method will take you step-by-step through a complete training cycle for a combat dog.

CONDITIONING

It is my theory that if dog A and dog B are equal in natural ability and gameness and dog A has been better prepared (conditioned) for his fight than dog B, then dog A should win the match; and he will 9 times out of 10. In this keep, we will try to do everything possible to help our dog's chances of winning while not doing anything to hurt him in anyway. I believe that, in training, if you dog 10% or 15% more for your dog that you opponent does for his, then you will win at least 4 times out of 5. I might add that is is the little things that count in the long run. You must follow the general formula of this keep, if you wish to see the maximum benefit and the best results.

FEED AND WEIGHT

It is best for the dog and easier on your pocket book to keep your dog within 3 or 4 pounds of his fighting weight all the time. Excess weight and fat will just strain the heart and vascular system. If your dog is more than 3 pounds over match weight, then prior to the keep, you should just put him on a low fat, high protein diet. Weigh your dog each day just prior to feeding. Never try to take off more than one pound per week. Any more will weaken him. Your feed should consist of 1/4 to 1/2 pound of lean meat and cottage cheese and 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 cups of Purina high protein dog food once per day, depending on the size of the dog. Neck meat off of a bull is the best meat that you can get. Always feed the meat in big pieces so that it will take longer to pass through the dog. Quite often, you can find an animal by-products factory in your area. These places pick up fresh, dead or crippled livestock from farmers, and you can buy fresh beef or horse meat at around .10 or .12 cents a pound. Never feed your dog more than he will eagerly eat. If you some reason he doesn't eat eagerly, take the food away until his next scheduled feed - this will bring his appetite around. Always weight or measure the feed. No guesswork. If you weight the meat and measure the dry food, then as you weight your dog each day, you can increase or decrease his food to control his weight. Do not try to fight your dog too thin as it will weaken him. Always watch the dog's stool every day for any unusual signs such as blood or diarrhea. His stool will give you a daily indicator of his general health. Always keep fresh water available to the dog. Bottled mineral water is also very good for him. Allow your dog to cool off after working him before giving him any water.

Feeding at night is the best, as a general rule. Most matches are at night and it is important for your dog to be empty at the time of the match. Do not feed that for the last 24 hours before a match. Do not give water the last 12 hours. Try to be as regular as possible about the time of feeding. In hot weather, your dog will eat better at night when it is cool.

Give your dog a One-A-Day vitamin + iron and one tablespoon of Clovite conditioner in his food each day. 

Was his food bowl before you feed him each day and give him fresh water every day.

WORK

Before you start the keep, you should give your dog several days or even 2 or 3 weeks of 10 or 15 minute workouts. Either roadwork or on a treadmill is fine. This will get him uses to working and will toughen his feet. Always pay careful attention to his feet for cuts, bruises, or for wearing his pads thin. I like to paint his pads with Bonocain until they get tough. Bonocain is also good for any injuries to his pads. 

Always avoid over-working your dog. If he gets overly tired or starts breathing rough and straining during a work out, stop and walk him until his breathing becomes normal and easy. As you gradually increase his work, your dog will get a little more exhausted, but he should take the amount of work in his keep with no difficulty. If the situation arises that he can't take the daily increases, give him the amount of work that he can take for a few days. He will soon be ready to get back on schedule. Remember too, dogs have their bad days just like humans. If he doesn't act really eager during a workout, rest him that day. That will sharpen him back up. 

Hand walking is one of the best ways to get your dog in top condition. It is a little harder on the trainer, but it really pays off in the pit. You cannot overwork your dog by walking him. If you have the time, up to 5 miles per days is ideal. Always walk your dog 1/2 mile before and after each workout. This is the least amount of walking that you can get by with and still get top condition.

The amount of work called for in this keep will bring your dog to a peak of condition. But, if your dog runs especially hard, you may have to give him a little less work. If you have a lazy dog, it will just take a lot of patience on your part. If you have a lazy dog, let him run after a cat one day and a chicken the next, or you can experiment around and possible find some other animal he likes especially well. 

This work schedule is the most desirable, but you should be flexible enough to fit it to each individual dog according to his ability. Remember, some dogs just have a lot more natural wind that others. This schedule is listed both in miles and in minutes on a treadmill. If you use a mill, it is very important that it runs free and doesn't make your dog pull too hard.

WEEK ONE

Sunday - No work

In the afternoon, give him a 2 cc injection of combiotic and 2 tablespoons of Milk of Magnesia

Monday - 3 mile walk or 15 minutes mill 

1/2 teaspoon B-15

Tuesday - 3 1/2 mile walk or 18 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Wednesday - 4 mile walk or 21 minutes mill 

1/2 tsp. B-15

Thursday - 4 1/2 mile walk or 24 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Friday - 5 mile walk or 27 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Saturday - 5 1/2 mile walk or 30 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15


WEEK TWO

Sunday - rest

1/2 tsp. B-15

Monday - 6 mile walk or 33 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Tuesday - 6 1/2 mile walk or 36 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Wednesday - 7 mile walk or 39 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Thursday - 7 1/2 mile walk or 42 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Friday - 8 mile walk or 45 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Saturday - 8 1/2 miles or 48 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15


WEEK THREE

Sunday - rest

1/2 tsp. B-15

Monday - 9 mile walk or 51 minutes mill 

1/2 tsp. B-15

Tuesday - 9 1/2 miles or 54 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15 
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Wednesday - 10 mile walk or 57 minutes mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Thursday - 10 1/2 mile walk or 1 hour mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Friday - 11 mile walk or 1 hr. 3 min. mill

1/2 tsp B-15
1/2 cc male hormone

Saturday - 11 1/2 miles or 1 hr. 6 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15


WEEK FOUR

Sunday - rest

1/2 tsp B-15
2 cc combiotic

Monday - 12 miles or 1 hr. 9 min. mill

1/2 tsp B-15

Tuesday - 12 1/2 mile walk or 1 hr. 12 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Wednesday - 13 miles or 1 hr. 15 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Thursday - 13 1/2 miles or 1 hr. 18 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Friday - 14 miles or 1 hr. 21 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15 
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12

Saturday - 14 1/2 mile walk or 1 hr. 24. min mill

1/2 tsp. B-15


WEEK FIVE

Sunday - rest

1/2 tsp. B-15

Monday - 15 mile walk or 1 hr. 27 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Tuesday - 15 mile walk or 1 hr. 30 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15 
1/2 cc male hormone
1/2 cc B-12 (this will be the last injection of B-12)

Wednesday - 15 mile walk or 1 hr. 30 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Thursday - 15 mile walk or 1 hr. 30 min. mill

1/2 tsp. B-15

Friday - 15 mile walk or 1 hr. 30 min. mill

1 tsp. B-15 
1/2 cc male hormone

Saturday - 15 mile walk or 1 hr. 30 min. mill

1 tsp. B-15


WEEK SIX

Sunday - rest

1 tsp. B-15

Monday - 10 mile walk or 1 hour mill

Tuesday - 10 mile walk or 1 hour mill

Wednesday - 5 mile walk or 30 minutes mill

Thursday - 3 mile walk

1 tsp. B-15

Friday - 3 mile walk

1 tsp. B-15

Friday - 2 mile walk

1 tsp. B-15
Approximately 24 hours before the match, give 1 cc male hormone

Saturday - rest

3 hours before the match, give 1 tsp. B-15

1 hour before the match, insert a glycerin suppository in the dog's rectum to be sure he empties out. Hand walk slowly until it's time to wash your dog.

This keep is based on a Saturday night fight. If you fight on Friday, start one day earlier, for a Sunday fight, one day later.


IMPORTANT NOTES

If you must travel with your dog over 100 miles, you should stop every 100 miles and hand walk your dog 8 or 10 minutes.

During this keep, you should take your dog for a ride in the car once or twice each week, taking him for a longer ride each time. This will get your dog used to traveling and will make the ride to the match a lot easier on him.

If you have to travel over 300 miles, you should go a day early so your dog will get a one day rest before the match.

Never try to match or condition a wormy dog. He must be free of parasites. If your dog has had hookworms, it will be at least 3 months before he is fully recovered. Hookworms hurt both his blood count and his wind.

Vitamin B-12 will cause your dog to overheat if used the last 10 days before the match.

If you use a treadmill, always stay with him during his workout. Don't go eat supper or watch TV. Remember anything can go wrong. Do not match your dog too light with this keep. It is better to match a pound heavier than a pound lighter. All injections are in the thigh muscle with a 1/2 inch 26 gauge needle. Shoot in the left leg on Tuesday and the right leg on Friday or vice versa. Always wash your opponent's dog to be sure you don't get your dog poisoned. Buy yourself a rule book and study it so you will know the rules well. During workouts, talk to your dog; praise him and encourage him. Pet him often. Remember, the more your dog likes you and trusts you, the longer and harder he will fight for you.

IN CONCLUSION

There are not great secrets in conditioning. Any dog fighter that does his own conditioning can tell you that the only secret is dedication. 

Monday, September 9, 2013

The Standard of the Bull Terrier

The Standard of the Bull Terrier by Sporting Bull Terrier.

THE STANDARDS

Below we publish the standard and points of the bench show White English Bull Terrier, and also the standard of the Pit Bull Terrier; the one which was adopted by the Pit Bull Terrier Breeders' Association.

We are reproducing a few illustrations of the best English Bull Terriers, for comparison with the pit dog type, many illustrations of the latter being interspersed, with brief descriptions of the subjects, throughout these pages.

THE BULL TERRIER STANDARD

As Approved By the Bull Terrier Club of America.

Head - Should be long, but with due regard first to type. Skull as nearly flat as possible and widest between the ears. Viewed from above, it should taper gradually and merge into the muzzle without perceptible break in the line. There should be a slight indention down the middle, but without "stop" and with as little brow as possible. Fore face filled right up to the eyes. Preferably the fore face should have a decided "downed". Eyes, very small, black, set high on the head, close together and obliquely. They should be either almond shaped or triangular, preferably the latter. Wall eye is a disqualification. Muzzle, wide and tapering, but without so much taper as to make the nose appear pinched. Muzzle should be neither square nor snippy, but should present a rounded appearance as viewed from above. Nose broad, wholly black, and with wide open nostrils. Dudley or wholly flesh colored nose is a disqualification. Under jaw strong and well defined. Lips should meet closely and evenly all around, should not run too far back, and there should be an entire absence of "lippiness". Teeth sound, strong, clean, regular and meeting evenly. Any deviation from this rule, such as "pig jaw," "undershot" or "overshot," is a bad fault. Ears when standing erect should not cause noticeable wrinkling of the skin on the head. Ears should be cropped, should be straight and of moderate length. It is important that there be as little cheek as possible, but where it is present it should not be bunchy or prominent, but should merge gradually into the lines of the muzzle and neck.

Neck - Slightly arched, tapering from shoulders to head and free from looseness of skin.
Shoulders - Strong and muscular, but without any appearance of heaviness or "loading". Shoulder blades wide, flat and sloping well back.

Back - Short, strong and muscular. Should be higher at withers than hips. There should be no slackness nor falling away behind the withers, but back should be slightly arched at loin, with loins well developed and slightly tucked. Ribs well sprung, close together and intercostal muscles well developed; back ribs deep. Chest deep from withers to brisket and wide from front to back ribs, but should not be broad as a lewd facing the dog.

Tail - Short in proportion to the size of the dog, set on low, broad where it joins the body and tapering to a point, should be straight and should not be carried above the level of the back.

Legs - Should have big, round bone and strong, straight, upright pasterns. The whole foreleg should be reasonably straight, but without the stilt mess of the Fox Terrier. Thighs, somewhat long, with muscle well developed, but without "loading". Hocks, short, fairly straight, well let down and should turn neither in nor out as viewed from behind.

Feet - Of the cat pattern, with toes short, well arched and close together. Pads strong and nails short.
Coat - Short, close, stiff to the touch, and with fine gloss.
Color - White markings, although objection able, are not a disqualification.
Weight - Is not a matter of importance, so long as the specimen is typical.
Faults - Light bone, round eyes, badly placed eyes, light eyes, domed skulls, butterfly noses, noticeable cheekiness, dished faces, lippiness, throatiness, teeth not meeting evenly, long or slack backs, long, thick or "gay" tails, loose shoulders, crooked elbows, loaded shoulders or thighs, weak pasterns, pig feet, toes turning either in or out, markings.

PIT BULL TERRIER STANDARD

As Approved By the Pit Bull Terrier Breeders' Association.

Head - Of medium length, skull flat and widest at the ears, prominent cheeks and forehead free from wrinkles
Stop - Well defined, indenture not too deep.
Muzzle - Square and wide as viewed from the front, presenting a round appearance as viewed from above. Under jaw, strong and well defined
Lips - Meet closely and evenly all around, not running too far back with an entire absence of any lippiness
Teeth - Clean, sound and strong, meeting evenly
Nose - Black, nostrils wide and open
Neck - Slightly arched, tapering from shoulders to head, and free from any looseness of skin. Shoulders, strong, muscular, shoulder blades, wide and sloping back
Back - Short, strong and muscular, higher at withers than hips, slightly arched at loins, which should be well developed and slightly tucked
Ribs - Well sprung, close together, back ribs deep
Chest - Deep from withers to brisket, wide from front to back ribs, not too broad as viewed facing the dog.
Tail - Short in comparison to size, set on low, wide where it joins the body and tapering to a fine point, not carried over the back.
Legs - To have large, round bone, and strong, straight, upright pasterns. Reasonably straight without semblance of bow.
Thighs - Long, muscle well developed. Hocks straight, well let down, turning neither in nor out as viewed from behind
Feet - Of moderate size, toes of medium length, well arched and close together. Pads strong and nails short.
Gait - Springy and active, without roll or pace.
Coat - Short, close, stiff to the touch and with fine gloss.
Color - Uniform, any color permissible, markings not objectionable.
Weight - Not important, preferably between 24 and 56 pounds.
Eyes - Round, black color preferred. As seen from the front they should be situated low down in the skull, as far from the ears as possible, with corners in a line at right angles with stop. As wide apart as possible to be within the line of cheek as viewed from the front.
Ears - To be cropped, straight, of moderate length, and should not cause wrinkling of the skin when held erect

Sunday, September 8, 2013

Howard Heinzl - Letter

Hi, Pete:

Got yours a while back. You're probably right, if I knew what I was doing, I'd get rid of these pooches and stick with horses. You, Pete, are what J.P. Colby would call a "haphazard" breeder. That's about the way I figured before I met J.P. in '35. Billy Sunday was the hottest dog in the country then, (just before Braddock came on) both were great pit dogs, but both sired cur pups. They both were picked up on the street and had faked papers. They were freaks, who could fight, in spite of the way they were bred. I'd rather breed to a dog who had four honest grandparents, even if he wouldn't take hold, than a pit ace I didn't know the breeding on. I have 30 dogs now and owned the great grandparents on all of them, except one bitch. When I came out here in '40, I had 2 bitches from J.P. Colby, Penny and Pooch, and one line bred daughter of Bruce's Jerry. I also had one half interest with Bud Borrelli, in Colby's Buddy (the sire of Rifle). I have pictures of these dogs, and they look just like the dogs I have today. In '42, I got another bitch from Colby's Scarlet. I bred her to Hubbard's Gimp, as his dam was Tudor's Goldie, with Bruce's Jerry blood on the top side. I think this is a great family of dogs and Colby blood adds temper to their metal. Way back, they are at least 1/2 Colby to start with. In '40, Wiz Hubbard had two dogs, a black male he called Smokey from a guy in Ohio and a 39 pound bitch, Lady (a game one), from Ormsby, in New York. He got Gimp in '41, and Lena from Leo White in '42. Chuck Doyle had the last pure Feeley dogs that I know of. In '38, he had Feeley's Rose and Feeley's Cricket, UKC 120-274 (dam of Bruce's Jerry). I saw Harry Clark at just two fights in Kentucky, in '32 or '33? He was a stake holder at the Midas, Spider go, and Bruce Johnson and I matched against Clark and the Murphy Brothers of Detroit, but they hired Art Schindler to condition and handle - fought in Lockport, Illinois.

A guy just called and told me that his brother to your bitch died. He stopped an older dog, Sunday in one hour. If he had waited another year, he might have made a good one. Del Brandstrom had two out of that litter and had been rolling the hell out of them, one lost an eye. A few weeks ago, one killed the other, but I think it's the one-eyed one that's left, and he got several toes bit off. I still have Musty and Patch and may try that cross again. I like the breeding on all four grandparents. Pete - pure Colby; DeeDee - Feeley, Colby; Clancy, Feeley, Colby; Brendy, pure Colby. Just like I've had since 1939. I got my first dog from John P. Colby in '30, Dinah (bred to Blind Jack).

More later,

- Howard Heinzl

Saturday, September 7, 2013

The Construction of a Kennel

How to Build a Dog Kennel - THE CONSTRUCTION OF A KENNEL by Sporting Bull Terrier.

The following article is a description of a kennel suitable for the convenience of twenty-five dogs and as many puppies. First should be considered the location. This should be high and dry, a side hill giving the best results so that excessive rains will not form pools of water in the kennel yard. Select your site, and stake it often rods square. Get cedar posts nine feet long, set them in the ground three feet, one rod apart, taking special care that corner posts are firmly anchored. Dig a trench from post to post eighteen inches deep. Next, get some No. 12 galvanized wire, lay this in trench and staple to each post, drawn tight with wire stretcher. After this wire is drawn tight all around the yard, at bottom of trench, then stretch the second wire just two inches above the lower wire, then the third, and so on until you have nine rows of wire two inches apart. Next, throw the earth into the trench, leaving the top wire exposed. By taking this precaution you may rest assured that your dogs will never trouble you by digging out of the kennel yard. Now, get forty loads of good, reliable kennel fencing, which should be six feet high, and a two-inch mesh. Fasten it to the posts firmly, the lower wire meeting the top wire previously fastened from post to post.

The foundation of the kennel building should be next considered. This should be of stone, 18 inches thick and three or four feet high, 16 x 60, which will furnish ample room. Have an opening at each end of the wall, two by three feet, to allow the dogs to run in during hot days or stormy weather. Next lay the joists, then the studding, which should be six or seven feet high. Have a good pitch to the roof. Before putting on siding or shingling, get some good building paper, covering all sides and roof. For this purpose there is nothing finer made than "Cabot's" sheathing, a superior building paper, two layers of paper between which is woven eel grass, one-fourth of an inch in thickness. This paper will keep out heat as well as cold, is germ proof, and cannot burn on account of the salty nature of the lining. Place this on roof boards before shingling if a thorough job is wanted. Next, put on your siding. Have three windows on each side, 30 x 60 inches, with two sash that will slide by each other, which are much handier than ones that raise. A well-lighted kennel is much more healthful than a dark one. Have door at each end of the kennel. Have a brick chimney built at each end of the kennel. In summer time you can use the chimney in cook room with short length of pipe; in cold weather you can run a stovepipe the full length of the building to the other chimney, which will warm up the interior at no great expense while the food is being cooked. Next, put up a partition at each end of the building 10 x 16 feet, one to be used for cook and wash room, the other for office. The floor on the wash room should be built on a slant to allow all water to run away freely.

You will now have a space of forty feet between office and cook room which will be used for kennels or stalls for the dogs as follows: On each side of the building from office to cook room make a solid bin or box of matched flooring three feet high and four feet wide; the framework of this stall should be of two-inch strips one inch thick; have them cut three and four feet long, nail firmly at corner, one of each size; this will form a square; now draw a line from one end of room to the other on each side near wall; this will line up your framework perfectly. Nail one end of the frame to each studding, the other corner to the floor; now proceed to put on your matched flooring. Nail the front solid, the top should be on hinge to get at the dogs and clean out easily, so only nail firmly the first two boards near the wall, then have the balance of the top work on hinge. Now divide this long stall into small compartments by placing a partition of matched flooring at every second studding or four feet, the studding being set two feet apart; have the top sawed across every four feet so that each stall will have a separate door at top, which will give you ten separate stalls on each side. Now, have an opening cut through the siding, 12 x 18 inches, for a door in each stall, opening into the yard; have this at one end of each stall instead of at the center, so your dogs can lay away from the doorway in case of heavy winds or hot or cold weather. In winter weather, for day protection, have a common grain sack or carpet tacked on inside over the door to keep out cold and severe droughts. For night protection a dog should have even more than this, for a dog, like a human being, enjoys comfort at night. For this purpose the simplest and best method is to have a sliding door on the outside. This should be made of matched flooring, four inches wider and longer than the opening, and have this door made so it will slide easily up and down by placing a screw eye on top to which is fastened a good heavy cord, having this cord pass up and over a pulley through a hole into the building, so that the door can be raised or lowered at will from each side of the building. After the stalls are made you will have a large room, 40 feet long and eight feet wide, where you can keep a sick clog, or bitches in season, or use it as a store room for crates, etc. One side of the kennel and yard should be kept for matured dogs, the other for puppies and bitches in season, or for bitches with pups. In order to protect pups and bitches in season, get some wire fencing and divide off one side of kennel yard same as their stalls, nail one end of fencing firmly to building, or to a post set at building, and have this fencing go straight out to the post at outside fencing, which composes your main kennel fence. This will give you ten separate yards that are four feet wide and about forty feet long, sufficient for the puppies until they are old enough to go in the main yard with the matured dogs. Bitches kept in an enclosure like this are absolutely safe from stray stud dogs, neither can they get out, as has been the source of much annoyance to many owners of bitches in season.

Do not neglect to place eave troughs on the building, and have a large tank to catch the water so that you may always have a good supply of soft water for washing the dogs. The handiest tub to wash dogs in is made of clear pine boards, 14 inches wide, 6 feet long. Make the box tight and paint it. With a box like this you can work all around your dogs in washing. Place this tub near the tank, have the tank elevated, so that after washing you can give the dog a good rinsing from the tank, which should have a faucet and short piece of hose at the bottom. Remember that the kennel yard should be plowed up or spaded over about once a month; this will keep the soil in a sweet and sanitary condition. Do not forget that a dog likes to lie under the spreading branches of a shade tree, and that it will add to their comfort to have a generous amount of trees set in the yard as well as a row around it. For this purpose there is not a handsomer or more thrifty, fast-growing tree than the Carolina poplar, not the tall, lanky Lombardy poplar, which is an eye-sore and nuisance. The Carolina poplars can be secured from any nursery at from 15 to 25 cents each when ten feet high; these will make large trees in three years. The kennel yard should not be complete without a good water supply, or a pump or well, so that the dogs can have a fresh drink several times a day. An earthen dish of good size is best for this, and have it sunk in the ground to keep the water cool. If convenience is wanted and small expense not objected to, it would be well to have a one-inch pipe run from the pump to each of the yards leading to each dish, at the pump you could have a connection that would fill each dish independently, or fill all at one time, this would avoid the bother of carrying water in a pail to each dish.

An excellent kennel for one dog can be made from an old kerosene barrel, which should be burned out to do away with the disagreeable smell before using. This can be done by placing a handful of shavings at the bottom of the barrel and setting them on fire. After the oil has been burned off the inside, turn the barrel over with open end to the ground, which will smother the flames. If you give your dog an ordinary box for a bed, it is a good plan to line it with tar paper, which will act as a disinfectant and also have a tendency to make the place uninhabitable for fleas and other vermin. A piece of carpeting should be placed at the bottom of the box for the dog to lie on.

A Good Sleeping Box

Hardening your dogs is a precaution against disease. Dogs naturally accommodate themselves to changes in temperature, if gradually exposed. The sudden change from the house to the yard on extremely cold days is a shock, but sleeping and laying in the open develops the coats and reinforces the constitution, stimulates the appetite and makes a vigorous, resourceful dog. From 60 to 100 cubic feet of damp-proof kennel, set up dry, in an unexposed place, makes a suitable sleeping quarters without any artificial heat. It should be built of two layers of matched sheathing with a layer of paper between. A sloping roof hinged at back so it may be lifted for cleaning, by raising the entire roof, no portion of the interior will be inaccessible A double acting door, raised eight inches or so from the base, will keep out droughts and will permit the dogs to enter and leave without catching in the bedding. Ventilation should be amply provided by 1 1/2-inch holes bored through near the upper ends. The entire box should have a super-structure to keep snow and rain from the roof and drain well over the side opposite to where the dog enters. A sub-floor underneath will keep it dry. Dogs soon learn the workings of the double-acting door hinged at top and will seek shelter when they want it and likewise go into the open when tempted to exercise. Only one precaution is necessary the care of the bedding, which should be clean oat or rye straw, free from dust and absolutely dry. For older dogs mats can be placed over the straw. Cost of box, including painting and hardware, lumber and labor, $500 Lumber pan be cut to size at mill.